Wednesday, July 8, 2009

Write a Non-Fiction Book First to Sell More Than You Ever Dreamed

By Earma Brown


Does your title do its job well? I mean does it help explain what's in your book? Does it capture the interest, engage, or shock the senses of your potential reader? Expert studies show the title may be responsible for up to 90% of your book's magnetic pulling power...

Titles are one of the most important aspects of your book. Did you know the average reader, publisher or editor only spends about 6 seconds looking at the front cover of any book. They spend not much longer, about 15 seconds, on the back cover. That leaves an author about 20 seconds to make a good impression on a potential reader. How will your title measure up in those few seconds?

Does your title do its job well? I mean does it help explain what's in your book? Does it capture the interest, engage, or shock the senses of your potential reader? Expert studies show the title may be responsible for up to 90% of your book's magnetic pulling power. Some even say at least half of your book's success can be attributed to its title. Use these top two title sizzlers and sell more books than you ever dreamed.

1. Allow reader benefits to drive your title
A winning non-fiction title immediately communicates the benefit readers will gain after reading your book. Benefit-oriented books often use the problem-solution approach. Master (A) this skill or technique and get (B) this benefit.

Readers buy non-fiction books for a "benefit" for something that will help them, grow them, profit more, less expense, less trouble, gain more time, less stress, better relationships, better health, less drama, less trauma, more energy and vitality and less fatigue.

Napoleon Hill's "Think and Grow Rich" or Dottie Walter's "Speak and Grow Rich" both instantly communicate the benefit of reading their book. They used the benefit driven, problem solution approach: Do this and get that. Psychological studies have proven that there are certain words that can help you connect to your potential readers and motivate them to buy from you. Here's a list of words that can help you connect.

Free Sale How to Healthy
Love Now Discover Guarantee
Safe Value Introduce Natural
New Fun Easy Fast
Benefits Save Your Precious
Right Gain Proven Secret
You Money Penetrate Solution
Alternative Happy Suddenly Magic
Security Advice Proud Comfortable

Use these words to help express your book's benefits rather than its features. For example, don't say "This book has x, y, z features"; instead say "This book will save you time and money because it has proven x, y, and z."

Leave out a benefit in your title and it will not be as effective in hooking your potential reader at first sight. Title your book well to sell well. Offer a solution to your readers. Demonstrate your expertise in your area so that they will move to the next step of buying your product, engaging your services or at least asking for more information.

Notice the two of eight powerful principles we have just covered: "short," "concept," "benefit" or "curiosity" tile followed by a longer sub-title that explains. Notice how often "listing steps," "numbers," or "time range" appear in the titles.

Make a note of your favorite titles. You can simply write them on a sheet of paper. Take a break, overnight is best, and allow your sub-conscious mind to mull over what you have learned. You'll be surprised one day soon after, your best title will emerge.

You owe it to yourself and book's success to develop your best title. After all, the better your title the more people will reach out and grab your book to read. Develop your title to have marketing appeal for the masses.



Earma Brown, 13 year author and business owner helps small business owners and writers who want to write their best book now!
Author of "Write Your Best Book
Now".Click Here


Article Source: Artipot

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